Letter Value Counts

I thought it would be informative to count the number of times a letter was used for a particular value, and here are the results for the 31 labels that use Set 1:

Value Counts #1

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5 thoughts on “Letter Value Counts

  1. Have you done a phoneme-frequency check using all known variant forms for star-names?

    I ask this because the frequency of names beginning “Alk” or “Alh” is significantly greater than most.

    Also, I’m not sure when the term ‘Castor’ came into common use; In the Alfonsine Tables (according to Hinkley Allen, anyway), it is Anhela, and still in the 16thC Apian has it Anelar, while Riccioli calls it Elgiautzi and so forth. So assuming you’re right – that the plant and star both bear the same name here, getting the phonetic values for the glyphs would need a bit more (wouldn’t it?)

  2. No, I haven’t done such a count. My two prime resources are Allen’s “Star Names” and “The Names of the Stars and Constellations” (links to both on the sidebar).

    “Castor” is not used in the one example of that star I’ve found; It is labeled “Ras al Taum”.

    Plant labels are not something I’ve studied yet; the Astro section is enough.

  3. hi Robert – Hinkley-Allen is invaluable, but if you can get hold one or more of Paul Kunitzsch’s books, you will get the current conservative opinion (here, conservative is good). K. has written in English as well as German. If the books are a bit out of reach, you might be able to get through your library “Star Catalogues and Star Tables in Medieval Oriental and European Astronomy.” Indian Journal of History of Science vol. 21 (1986): pp. 113-122. Maybe. These give alternatives, and alternative spellings too. Otherwise, a good check against Hinkley Allen is offered in English by Emilie Savage-Smith among others.

    Personal note: my sister in law and family lived in the same small village as Kunitzsch – small world, indeed?

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